What Is The Strongest Algaecide?

What is the best algaecide?

Here are the top 7 pool algaecides on the market today.Kem-Tek KTK-50-0006 Pool and Spa 60% Concentrated Algaecide.

In The Swim Super Pool Algaecide.

Clorox Pool and Spa Green Algae Eliminator.

PoolRX Algaecide Unit.

SeaKlear 90-Day Algae Prevention and Remover.

EasyCare 30064 PoolTec Algaecide.More items…•Jan 1, 2020.

What naturally kills algae?

Barley straw will slowly kill algae naturally as it rots. If you have a pond or body of water you want to keep free of algae, try tossing a small bale of barley straw into it. You can also use creatures that naturally eat algae to kill it.

How often should I add algaecide to my pool?

Algaecide should be added to your pool water on a weekly basis. Preventing algae is the key to fun in your pool. Algaecides act as a backup to your normal sanitization program and prevent algae from growing in your pool. Algaecide should be added after every shock treatment.

Can you shock a pool two days in a row?

It’s pretty tough to over-shock your pool; shocking your pool two days in a row with the proper dosage for your pool volume shouldn’t be a problem – and in fact, is sometimes even needed to rid your pool of algae and other contaminants.

Can you over shock a pool?

Can you “over shock” your pool? In short, pool shock is simply a concentrated form of chlorine. Shocking your pool, or super chlorination is simply adding enough chlorine to destroy the buildup of chloramines. So, adding too much of it can’t be good…

Can too much algaecide make a pool cloudy?

If you add algaecide, keep in mind that some algaecide contains copper, which can actually make a pool cloudy. If the cloudiness persists 24 hours after shocking, then it’s possible that you used a poor-quality chlorine shock.

What is the strongest algaecide for pools?

Best swimming pool algaecide for all pools For an all-purpose swimming pool algaecide, we recommend Kem-Tek 60% Algaecide Concentrate. This pool and spa algaecide contains 60% of its active ingredient, polyquaternium WSCP. It’s effective at removing most types of algae and preventing them from returning.

What can you use instead of algaecide?

Grab a brush and some baking soda. Bicarbonate, the active ingredient in baking soda, is an effective spot treatment to help kill the algae and loosen it from the wall. Make sure you really get every last particle free; black algae has particularly long and stubborn roots which makes it a persistent strand.

How long does it take for algaecide to dissipate?

As for your foaming, it will dissipate over time as the algaecide will slowly break down from chlorine. You can shock the pool with higher chlorine levels if you want to get rid of it faster, but this is not necessary as it will go away probably in about a week (two at the most).

What time of day is best to shock a pool?

eveningBEST TIME OF DAY TO SHOCK? After you have cleaned the pool of all debris it is best to shock in the evening because the sun’s UV rays will dissolve the chlorine too quickly before it has a chance to attach and oxidize.

Why is my pool still green after shock and algaecide?

When pool chemicals are not properly maintained it is easy for pH levels to get out of whack quickly leading to a green pool. If you have already shocked your pool and taken pH level samples you may still need to add stabilizers or phosphate removers.

How long after adding algaecide can you shock?

24 hoursIt’s important to know that using pool shock and algaecide together can create bad chemical reactions if you don’t take the necessary precautions. Your chlorine levels won’t return to normal right after you shock your pool anyway, so we recommend waiting at least 24 hours to add algaecide.

Does algaecide go bad?

Algaecides. When properly stored (cool and dry indoor location), pool algaecides are quite stable and most will maintain potency for at up to 5 years.

Do I use shock or algaecide first?

While shocking and adding algaecide is effective in getting rid of algae, it should not be done together. This is because when you mix chlorine and algaecide together, it renders both of them useless. Hence, you should first shock the pool and wait for the chlorine levels to fall below 5 PPM.

How long after adding algaecide Can you swim?

30 minutesIt is best to wait 30 minutes after adding it to your pool. We recommend waiting at least 15 minutes to swim after adding algaecide to your swimming pool. Most algaecides are perfectly safe to swim with. It is not recommended to swim with flocculent in your pool as it will reduce its effectiveness.

Why is my algaecide foaming?

The algaecide in the kit can cause some foam if there is no algae in the pool to destroy – it lingers around with nothing to kill. Spring time algaecides use surfactants to work and these molecules can react with agitation to cause froth. … Foam can also occur when the pool has low calcium hardness.

What happens if you add too much algaecide to your pool?

Swimmers inside a pool that has too much algaecide will witness an onset of eye and skin irritations. The smell you’re experiencing is likely algae, enhanced by the algaecide treatment that didn’t really work.

How do I get rid of algae in my pool fast?

Method #1: Get Rid of Pool Algae by Shocking Your Pool WaterSanitise your pool with a heavy treatment of chlorine, either granular or liquid. … Lower your pH with hydrochloric acid or pH Down Tablets. … Ensure the system is on and running for a 24 hour period to disperse the shock treatment around the pool.More items…

Does vinegar kill algae?

Vinegar can also be used to rid of algae. Use a mixture of water and white vinegar to spray down the area and kill the algae.

Does algaecide really work?

It may surprise you to learn that algaecide isn’t a magic bullet for getting rid of algae in your pool. In fact, algaecide is more effective as a preventive measure than a treatment. Don’t get us wrong—it still helps as an algae treatment, just not in the way you might think.

What does too much algaecide do?

The presence of too much algaecide can lead to a foamy pool water. … Air pockets within the filter system can cause bubbles on the pool surface as well. The bubbles and foam resulting from too much algaecide will be much smaller in size.